How To Ask Your Mom About Birth Control?

Start out by reminding them that you love them no matter what, and that you want to talk with them because you care.

Ask them if they’re having sex, and if so, if they’re using birth control and condoms.

Let them know that you can help them with any questions they may have about birth control or condoms.

How do you ask for birth control?

  • Be Honest. Eric Audras/ONOKY/Getty Images.
  • Do Your Research. More than ever before, there are many birth control options available.
  • Don’t Make Assumptions.
  • Ask the Doctor About Your Options.
  • Questions Are Good.
  • Using Birth Control.
  • Ask Follow-Up Questions.
  • Don’t Be Embarrassed.

Can I get on birth control without my parents knowing?

In most states, teens are allowed to get birth control without their parents’ permission at their nearest Planned Parenthood health center or from their regular doctor or nurse. If you plan on using insurance to pay for your birth control, a statement may come in the mail showing what you used it for.

Will my parents know if I get birth control with insurance?

Basically, your parents can get some basic information about any activity that happens using their insurance. Since birth control (other than condoms) requires a prescription or office visit, you won’t be able to go under the radar and use their insurance for the visit or to pick up the prescription. But don’t give up!

How do I talk to my teenage daughter about birth control?

Start out by reminding them that you love them no matter what, and that you want to talk with them because you care. Ask them if they’re having sex, and if so, if they’re using birth control and condoms. Let them know that you can help them with any questions they may have about birth control or condoms.

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Does birth control make you thick?

It’s rare, but some women do gain a little bit of weight when they start taking birth control pills. It’s often a temporary side effect that’s due to fluid retention, not extra fat. And, as with other possible side effects of the pill, any weight gain is generally minimal and goes away within 2 to 3 months.

Is all birth control free?

Because of the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare), most insurance plans must cover all methods of birth control at no cost to you, including the pill. However, some plans only cover certain brands of pills or generic versions. Your health insurance provider can tell you which types of birth control they pay for.